Nursing Care Plan BPH with Diagnosis and Interventions

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Nursing Care Plan BPH with Diagnosis and InterventionsBenign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a histologic diagnosis characterized by proliferation of the cellular elements of the prostate. Cellular accumulation and gland enlargement may result from epithelial and stromal proliferation, impaired preprogrammed cell death (apoptosis), or both.

BPH is considered a normal part of the aging process in men and is hormonally dependent on testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) production. An estimated 50% of men demonstrate histopathologic BPH by age 60 years. This number increases to 90% by age 85 years.

Assessment

1. Circulation:

2. Elimination:

3. Food and fluid :

4. Pain :

5. Anxiety :

6. Sexuality :

Nursing Diagnosis for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)

1. Impaired Urinary Elimination: Urinary Retention related to mechanical obstruction of prostate enlargement, muscle decompensation destrusor, inability to empty the bladder, bladder distension.

2. Acute Pain related to mucosal irritation, distention of the bladder, renal colic, urinary infection.

3. Risk for Fluid Volume Deficit related to loss of body fluids is not normal, such as bleeding through the catheter, vomiting.

4. Anxiety related to change in health status, the possibility of surgical procedures.

5. Knowledge Deficit related to lack of information about the disease process.

 

Nursing Diagnosis and Interventions :

 

1. Impaired Urinary Elimination: Urinary Retention related to mechanical obstruction of prostate enlargement, muscle decompensation destrusor, inability to empty the bladder, bladder distension.

Goal:
Urination by a considerable amount.
Shows post-voiding residual of less than 50 ml in the absence of droplets / excess flow.

Intervention:

1. Encourage clients to urinate every 2 to 4 hours.
Rational : minimizing excessive retention of urine in the bladder.

2. Observation of the flow of urine. Note the size of the force.
Rational : useful for evaluating obstruction and intervention options.

3. Supervise and record time, the number of each micturition. Note the decrease in spending and changes in urine specific gravity.
Rational: urinary retention increases the pressure in the upper urinary tract that can affect the kidneys.

4. Encourage drinking water to 3000 ml / day
Rational : the increased flow of fluid to maintain renal perfusion and kidney cleanse, bladder from bacterial growth.

5. Perform catheterization and perianal care.
Rational : reduce the risk of ascending infection.

6. Collaboration of anti-spasmodic drugs, rectal suppositories, antibiotics
Rational: eliminating bladder spasm, while antibiotics to fight infection.

 

2. Acute Pain related to mucosal irritation, distention of the bladder, renal colic, urinary infection.

Goal:
Pain reported lost / controlled.
Looks relaxed.
Able to sleep / rest appropriately.

Intervention:

1. Assess the level of pain
Rational : provide information on the effectiveness of interventions.

2. Plaster drainage hose on the verge of defeat in the thigh and abdomen.
Rational : to prevent the withdrawal of the bladder, and penis skrotal erosion.

3. Maintain bed rest.
Rational : may be required at the beginning of acute retention but early ambulation can improve normal voiding pattern.

 

3. Risk for Fluid Volume Deficit related to loss of body fluids is not normal, such as bleeding through the catheter, vomiting.

Goals:
Maintain adequate hydration

Evidenced by:
vitat signs stable,
palpable peripheral pulse,
good capillary refill mucous membranes moist.

Intervention:

1. Monitor fluid output per hour and record of urine.
Rational: rapid diuresis can result in the total volume of fluid deficiency due to insufficient amount of sodium absorption in the kidney tubules.

2. Encourage oral intake based on individual needs.
Rational: hemostatic and increased risk of hypovolemic dehydration.

3. Monitor blood pressure and pulse observation of the capillary and oral mucous membranes.
Rational: early detection of hypovolemic system.

4. Collaboration in the delivery of IV fluids (hypertonic saline physiology), as needed.
Rational: giving IV fluids that replace lost fluids and sodium to prevent / fix hipopolemik.

 

4. Anxiety related to change in health status, the possibility of surgical procedures.

Goals:
Looks relaxed.
Reported anxiety decreased to the level can be handled.
Declare an accurate knowledge of the situation.

Intervention:
1. Create a trusting relationship with the patient or the patient’s family is always around the patient.
Rational : showing concern and desire to help.

2. Provide information about procedures and special tests and what will happen samples; bloody urine catheter.
Rational : helping patients understand the purpose of what they do and reduce health problems including fear due to ignorance of cancer.

3. Encourage the patient / person closest to stating the problem.
Rational : define the problem provides an opportunity to answer questions, clarify misconceptions and problem-solving solutions.

 

5. Knowledge Deficit related to lack of information about the disease process.

Goals:
Expressed understanding of the disease process.
Participate in the treatment process.

Intervention:

1. Review the patient experiences the disease process.
Rational : provides the knowledge base in which the patient can make an informed choice of therapy.

2. Encourage states fear / feeling and attention.
Rational : helping patients may experience a feeling of vital rehabilitation.

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